Group Formation for Small-Group Learning: Are Heterogeneous Groups More Productive?

Title: Group Formation for Small-Group Learning: Are Heterogeneous Groups More Productive?

Authors: Astrid Wichmann (Ruhr-University Bochum), Tobias Hecking (University of Duisburg-Essen), Malte Elson, Nina Christmann, Thomas Herrmann (Ruhr-University Bochum), and H. Ulrich Hoppe (University of Duisburg-Essen)

Abstract: There is an underexploited potential in enhancing massive online learning courses through small-group learning activities. Size and diversity allow for optimizing group composition in small-group tasks. The purpose of this paper was to investigate how groups formed based on learner behavior affect productivity of students in a small-group task. Students classified as high, average and low were randomly assigned to homogeneous or heterogeneous groups. Results indicate that overall, heterogeneous groups were either similarly or a bit more productive than homogeneous groups. Yet, we found that homogeneous groups classified as high-level were as or more than heterogeneous groups. However, heterogeneous groups were still more productive than homogeneous-average and homogeneous-low groups suggesting heterogeneous groups are the best choice for the entire community. Students classified as low-level were more productive in homogeneous groups, suggesting that grouping less active students together, makes social loafing more difficult and students participate more.

This contribution to OpenSym 2016 will be made available as part of the OpenSym 2016 proceedings on or after August 17, 2016.

A Sector-Selection Methodology for Living Labs Implementation

Title: A Sector-Selection Methodology for Living Labs Implementation

Author: Dr Ir Robert VISEUR (CETIC)

Abstract: Creative Wallonia is a framework program that puts creativity and innovation at the heart of the redevelopment of Wallonia. In the context of Creative Wallonia, the Walloon government has decided to study the implementation of Living Lab pilot projects in Wallonia. The initiators required to identify two sectors in which the pilot phase could be addressed and conducted. This paper is dedicated to the sector selection methodology that was developed for the implementation of the Walloon Living Lab pilot projects. The paper is organized in three sections. In the first section we search for the criteria that could be used to select appropriate sectors. In the second section we present the developed methodology and the selection grid based on criteria. In the third section we discuss the grid and the results after application to the Walloon call for pilot projects. The contribution of the research consists in a methodology that allows to objectivize the choice of sectors that will be applied to the future Living Lab projects. Finally, a preliminary feedback about the living labs implementation is discussed.

This contribution to OpenSym 2016 will be made available as part of the OpenSym 2016 proceedings on or after August 17, 2016.

Operation Digital Chameleon – Towards an Open Cybersecurity Method

Title: Operation Digital Chameleon – Towards an Open Cybersecurity Method

Authors: Andreas Rieb and Ulrike Lechner (Universität der Bundeswehr München, Germany)

Abstract: In the Serious Game Operation Digital Chameleon red and blue teams develop attack and defense strategies to explore IT-Security of Critical Infrastructures as part of an IT-Security training. Operation Digital Chameleon is the training game of the IT- Security Matchplay series in the IT-Security for Critical Infrastructure research program funded by BMBF. We present the design of Operation Digital Chameleon in its current form as well as results from game #3. We analyze the potential and innovation capability of Operation Digital Chameleon as an Open Innovation method for the domain of IT-Security of Critical Infrastructures. We find that Operation Digital Chamaeleon facilitates creativity, opens the process of IT-Security strategy development and – despite being designed for training purposes – opens the process to explore innovative attack vectors.

This contribution to OpenSym 2016 will be made available as part of the OpenSym 2016 proceedings on or after August 17, 2016.

Open Concentration Index: Measure of Market Concentration in Open Source Industry

Title: Open Concentration Index: Measure of Market Concentration in Open Source Industry

Author: Dr Ir Robert Viseur (CETIC)

Abstract: The market concentration is a measure of competition and, as such, is closely monitored by public competition authorities in the European Union or the United States. Among recent claims in Europe, we study the case of the mobile operating system Google Android, despite its open source quality and the fact it can as such be regarded as presenting no risk in terms of market dominance. In this research, we analyze the concept of market concentration. We suggest that when a dominant or significant participant is open, such as is the case for the Apache web server in the overall web server market, the negative effects of high concentration are mitigated. As such, a new market concentration metric is proposed that takes into account openness, as measured by the Open Governance Index of Liz Laffan. We thus combine a concentration index and a governance index described in literature to obtain Open Concentration Index suitable for open source context.

This contribution to OpenSym 2016 will be made available as part of the OpenSym 2016 proceedings on or after August 17, 2016.

An Empirical Evaluation of Property Recommender Systems for Wikidata and Collaborative Knowledge Bases

Title: An Empirical Evaluation of Property Recommender Systems for Wikidata and Collaborative Knowledge Bases

Authors: Eva Zangerle, Wolfgang Gassler, Martin Pichl, Stefan Steinhauser, Günther Specht (University of Innsbruck)

Abstract: The Wikidata platform is a crowdsourced, structured knowledgebase aiming to provide integrated, free and languageagnostic facts which are amongst others used by Wikipedias. Users who actively enter, review and revise data on Wikidata are assisted by a property suggesting system which provides users with properties that might also be applicable to a given item. We argue that evaluating and subsequently improving this recommendation mechanism and hence, assisting users, can directly contribute to an even more integrated, consistent and extensive knowledge base serving a huge variety of applications. However, the quality and usefulness of such recommendations has not been evaluated yet. In this work, we provide the first evaluation of different approaches aiming to provide users with property recommendations in the process of curating information on Wikidata. We compare the approach currently facilitated on Wikidata with two state-of-the-art recommendation approaches stemming from the field of RDF recommender systems and collaborative information systems. Further, we also evaluate hybrid recommender systems combining these approaches. Our evaluations show that the current recommendation algorithm works well in regards to recall and precision, reaching a recall@7 of 79.71% and a precision@7 of 27.97%. We also find that generally, incorporating contextual as well as classifying information into the computation of property recommendations can further improve its performance significantly.

This contribution to OpenSym 2016 will be made available as part of the OpenSym 2016 proceedings on or after August 17, 2016.

Evaluating and Improving Navigability of Wikipedia: A Comparative Study of Eight Language Editions

Title: Evaluating and Improving Navigability of Wikipedia: A Comparative Study of Eight Language Editions

Authors: Daniel Lamprecht (KTI, Graz University of Technology), Dimitar Dimitrov (GESIS – Leibniz Institute for the Social Sciences), Denis Helic (KTI, Graz University of Technology) and Markus Strohmaier (GESIS – Leibniz Institute for the Social Sciences and University of Koblenz-Landau)

Abstract: Wikipedia supports its users to reach a wide variety of goals: looking up facts, researching a topic, making an edit or simply browsing to pass time. Some of these goals, such as the lookup of facts, can be effectively supported by search functions. However, for other use cases such as researching an unfamiliar topic, users need to rely on the links to connect articles. In this paper, we investigate the state of navigability in the article networks of eight language versions of Wikipedia. We find that, when taking all links of articles into account, all language versions enable mutual reachability for almost all articles. However, previous research has shown that visitors of Wikipedia focus most of their attention on the areas located close to the top. We therefore investigate different restricted navigational views that users could have when looking at articles. We find that restricting the view of articles strongly limits the navigability of the resulting networks and impedes navigation. Based on this analysis we then propose a link recommendation method to augment the link network to improve navigability in the network. Our approach selects links from a less restricted view of the article and proposes to move these links into more visible sections. The recommended links are therefore relevant for the article. Our results are relevant for researchers interested in the navigability of Wikipedia and open up new avenues for link recommendations in Wikipedia editing.

This contribution to OpenSym 2016 will be made available as part of the OpenSym 2016 proceedings on or after August 17, 2016.

A Framework for Open Assurance of Learning

Title: A Framework for Open Assurance of Learning

Authors: Gokul Bhandari and Maureen Gowing (Odette School of Business, University of Windsor)

Abstract: Assurance of Learning (AOL) refers to the outcomes assessment process which involves the systematic collection, review, and use of information about educational programs undertaken for the purpose of improving student learning and development [8]. While emerging trends such as open education, open learning, learning analytics, academic analytics, and big data in education have recently become mainstream, studies regarding the design and development of open source analytics applications for AOL are non-existent. In this paper, we describe an application called AOL Analyzer that we developed for our business school last year to assist in the analysis of AOL results reported by faculty. To the best of our knowledge, this is a first paper to bridge the existing gap in
AOL analytics research.

This contribution to OpenSym 2016 will be made available as part of the OpenSym 2016 proceedings on or after August 17, 2016.

User Generated Services during Software Introductions

Title: User Generated Services during Software Introductions

Authors: Martin Schymanietz and Nivedita Agarwal (University of Erlangen-Nuremberg)

Abstract: In this paper, we describe the lack of user participation and involvement during software introductions. Especially big projects with a volume larger than 10 million US$ are very likely to neglect important benchmarks like e.g. the budget or even completely fail. To fight these costly failures and support software introductions, we propose a service system that integrates the user into the software rollout. This service system consists of three service modules that are supported by components for feedback, communication, user incentives and motivation as well as. The service modules shall empower the users to give support and deliver tutorials or training to other users and furthermore establish a project specific platform which encourages a continuous improvement of the current software solution.

This contribution to OpenSym 2016 will be made available as part of the OpenSym 2016 proceedings on or after August 17, 2016.

Exploring the roles of external facilitators in IT-driven open strategizing

Title: Exploring the roles of external facilitators in IT-driven open strategizing

Authors: Josh Morton, Alex Wilson and Louise Cooke (Loughborough University; School of Business and Economics)

Abstract: This paper examines the different roles external facilitators have in information technology driven open strategizing. Using a strategy-as-practice lens and drawing on two empirical cases of open strategy in organizations, our paper highlights four emerging roles of external facilitators which we call; structuring, promoting, moderating and analyzing. In concluding the paper we call for further research relating to external facilitators and open strategy.

This contribution to OpenSym 2016 will be made available as part of the OpenSym 2016 proceedings on or after August 17, 2016.

Comparing OSM Area-Boundary Data to DBpedia

Title: Comparing OSM Area-Boundary Data to DBpedia

Authors: Doris Silbernagl, Nikolaus Krismer and Günther Specht (Department of Computer Science, University of Innsbruck, Austria)

Abstract: OpenStreetMap (OSM) is a well known and widely used data source for geographic data. This kind of data can also be found in Wikipedia in the form of geographic locations, such as cities or countries. Next to the geographic coordinates, also statistical data about the area of these elements can be present. Since it is possible to extract these data from OpenStreetMap as well, it is sensible to examine the quality of the OSM information about those specific boundary elements and compare them to an also crowd-sourced source like Wikipedia. Hence, in this paper OSM data of different countries are used to calculate the area of valid boundary (multi) polygons and are then compared to the respective DBpedia (a large scale knowledge base extract from Wikipedia) entries.

This contribution to OpenSym 2016 will be made available as part of the OpenSym 2016 proceedings on or after August 17, 2016.