Food at OpenSym 2016

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This is post 7 of 8 with impressions from OpenSym 2016. Photos were taken by a professional photographer. He was only active on the first day and during the afternoon and evening of the second day. We apologize to all who were not captured on photo. If you participated and would like to have your photo removed, please let us know.

Games and Fun at OpenSym 2016

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This is post 6 of 8 with impressions from OpenSym 2016. Photos were taken by a professional photographer. He was only active on the first day and during the afternoon and evening of the second day. We apologize to all who were not captured on photo. If you participated and would like to have your photo removed, please let us know.

Keynoters of OpenSym 2016

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This is post 5 of 8 with impressions from OpenSym 2016. Photos were taken by a professional photographer. He was only active on the first day and during the afternoon and evening of the second day. We apologize to all who were not captured on photo. If you participated and would like to have your photo removed, please let us know.

Location of OpenSym 2016

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This is post 4 of 8 with impressions from OpenSym 2016. Photos were taken by a professional photographer. He was only active on the first day and during the afternoon and evening of the second day. We apologize to all who were not captured on photo. If you participated and would like to have your photo removed, please let us know.

People of OpenSym 2016

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This is post 3 of 8 with impressions from OpenSym 2016. Photos were taken by a professional photographer. He was only active on the first day and during the afternoon and evening of the second day. We apologize to all who were not captured on photo. If you participated and would like to have your photo removed, please let us know.

Social Event at OpenSym 2016

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This is post 2 of 8 with impressions from OpenSym 2016. Photos were taken by a professional photographer. He was only active on the first day and during the afternoon and evening of the second day. We apologize to all who were not captured on photo. If you participated and would like to have your photo removed, please let us know.

Speakers of OpenSym 2016

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This is post 1 of 8 with impressions from OpenSym 2016. Photos were taken by a professional photographer. He was only active on the first day and during the afternoon and evening of the second day. We apologize to all who were not captured on photo. If you participated and would like to have your photo removed, please let us know.

Determining the Geographical distribution of a Community by means of a Time-zone Analysis

Title: Determining the Geographical distribution of a Community by means of a Time-zone Analysis

Authors: Jesus M. Gonzalez-Barahona, Gregorio Robles (Universidad Rey Juan Carlos) and Daniel Izquierdo-Cortazar (Bitergia)

Abstract: Free/libre/open source software projects are usually developed by a geographically distributed community of developers and contributors. In contrast to traditional corporate environments, it is hard to obtain information about how the community is geographically distributed, mainly because participation is open to volunteers and in many cases it is just occasional. During the last years, specially with the increasing implication of institutions, non-profit organizations and companies, there is a growing interest in having information about the geographic location of developers. This is because projects want to be as global as possible, in order to attract new contributors, users and, of course, clients. In this paper we show a methodology to obtain the geographical distribution of a development community by analyzing the source code management system and the mailing lists they use.

This contribution to OpenSym 2016 will be made available as part of the OpenSym 2016 proceedings on or after August 17, 2016.

Monitoring the Gender Gap with Wikidata Human Gender Indicators

Title: Monitoring the Gender Gap with Wikidata Human Gender Indicators

Authors: Maximilian Klein (GroupLens Research), Harsh Gupta, Vivek Rai (Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur), Piotr Konieczny (Hanyang University) and Haiyi Zhu (GroupLens Research)

Abstract: The gender gap in Wikipedia’s content, specifically in the representation of women in biographies, is well-known but has been difficult to measure. Furthermore the impacts of efforts to address this gender gap have received little attention. To investigate we utilise Wikidata, the database that feeds Wikipedia, and introduce the “Wikidata Human Gender Indicators” (WHGI), a free and open source, longitudinal, biographical dataset monitoring gender disparities across time, space, culture, occupation and language. Through these lenses we show how the representation of women is changing along 11 dimensions. Validations of WHGI are presented against three exogenous datasets: the world’s historical population, “traditional” gender-disparity indices (GDI, GEI, GGGI and SIGI), and occupational gender according to the US Bureau of Labor Statistics. Furthermore, to demonstrate its general use in research, we revisit previously published findings on Wikipedia’s gender bias that can be strengthened by WHGI.

This contribution to OpenSym 2016 will be made available as part of the OpenSym 2016 proceedings on or after August 17, 2016.

Urban Data Platforms – An Overview

Ina Schieferdecker of Fraunhofer FOKUS (Berlin), will be presenting the following keynote at OpenSym 2016:

Title: Urban Data Platforms – An Overview

Abstract: Along the increasing digitization and interconnection in almost every domain in society or business, data is growing exponentially. It is expected that the worldwide Internet traffic will triple until 2020 in comparison to 2015. In the same time, the transmitted data volume will move from 53,2 Exabytes per months to 161 Exabytes per months [Cisco, 2016]. Cities and communities can support the provisioning and usage of urban data and benefit from resulting new services for the monitoring, understanding, decision making, steering, and control. Providing urban data is also supported by the ongoing movement of opening governmental data, but goes beyond. Urban data can include data from public, industrial, scientific or private sources. Yet, the design of urban data is still ongoing and numerous initiatives and standardization efforts on smart cities and communities put the grounds for the uptake and interoperability of urban data.

Speaker’s Biography: Prof. Dr.-Ing. Ina Schieferdecker is Director of Fraunhofer FOKUS, Berlin, coordinates Open Data and ICT for Smart Cities at that institute and is also professor for Model-Driven Engineering and Quality Assurance of Software-Based Systems at Freie Universität Berlin. Her research interests include urban data platforms, critical infrastructures, networking, conformance, interoperability, security and certification. Schieferdecker received a PhD in electrical engineering from Technical University Berlin. She is President of the ASQF and member of the German Academy of Science and Engineering (acatech), IEEE, ACM, and GI. She is member of the Nationale Plattform Zukunftsstadt, of the acatech Working Group Stadt der Zukunft, of the Smart City Network Berlin and of Fraunhofer Morgenstadt.

This contribution to OpenSym 2016 will be made available as part of the OpenSym 2016 proceedings on or after August 17, 2016.